Poster exhibition coming in September

What is Notstock?

"Notstock" is an exhibition of poster art that will be on display at the historic Ellendale Opera House during the month of September.

Silkscreen posters created by some of the best artists in the Midwest are in the exhibit.

Print-making with phenomenal colors and creative skill. Notstock is a signature event held at Minot State College every year since 2007. Notstock is a word derived from Woodstock, Flatstock and "Why not Minot". It has encouraged engagement and exposure to the arts.

Silk screen‐printing 
is
 one 
of
 the 
newest printing techniques,
 yet
 it
 has
 ancient 
origins. Yet it
's one 
of 
the 
simplest,
 most
 direct
 procedures 
for 
obtaining
 multi-color 
images.

In 
the 
United
 States the 
screen 
print
 developed 
with in 
the 
commercial
printing industry. 
Posters, 
displays,
 signs, and 
billboards 
were 
produced
 using 
this
 method, in
 great 
quantities. It 
was 
a
reduction method 
similar 
to 
one 
used
 for
 some 
relief printing. Only 
one screen was
 used 
and 
the 
largest 
colors
 are 
printed
first; then 
part 
of 
the 
design
 was blocked 
out 
with 
glue 
and
 a 
second 
color printed; 
and
 so
 on 
until 
the 
print 
was finished.

The
 potential for
printing 
on 
diverse 
kinds 
of 
materials 
and
 surfaces 
was 
the
n ext big 
step 
in 
silk
-screening
 
furniture,
 lampshades,
 rugs,
 glassware, 
plastic,
 leather, toys 
and 
textiles
–the 
possibilities
 were 
almost 
endless.

Eventually 
photographic 
processes 
becam e
the
 most 
important 
of 
all
 processes 
in commercial
 screen‐printing.

It 
wasn’t 
until 
the 
1930's 
when
 a 
few 
artists 
and
 printmakers 
began 
to 
see silkscreening 
as 
potential
 for
 personal 
expression.


However, because
 exhibition opportunities were 
limited, 
due 
the to 
screen 
prints
 earlier 
commercial association, 
it was 
felt
 that a 
new 
name 
for 
the 
prints
 might 
link 
it 
to 
the
 fine 
arts. This 
is 
when 
the term
 serigraph
 was
 coined;
 seri 
the 
greek
word 
for 
silk, 
and
 graph as 
the 
Greek 
word meaning
 to
 draw
 or 
write.

With 
the 
advent 
of Pop 
Art,
 serigraphs 
became 
ever 
more 
popular
 and
 focused 
on replicating 
popular
 commercialism.


No
 longer 
was 
the 
fancy 
word
 serigraph useful. Artists 
were
 producing
 screen 
prints, 
and
 they 
were 
bold,
 huge, 
and multicolored.

Andy
 Warhol was 
the 
father
 of
 Pop 
Art
 and 
prospered 
because
 of 
his
 early
 career
 as
 an
 advertising 
illustrator,
 as
 well as,
 James
 Rosenquist
 a 
former
 billboard 
artist,
 and 
Roy
 Lichtenstein, who was knowledgeable with the
 commercial
 printing 
processes.
 These 
three artists 
made 
people
 see 
silk‐screening 
as
 a 
high 
art 
form.

Silk
 screen 
printing is alive and 
flourishing 
today.
 It is 
used 
to 
make images
 and
 text 
on t‐shirts,
 labels,
 circuit
boards,
 electronics, 
medical
 devices,
 signs,
 snowboards
 and skateboards.


There will be some exceptional silk screen posters on display during the month of September from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays and from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sundays. Also, the exhibit will be open all day Saturday during AppleFest.